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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1 in 13 people have asthma. More than 25 million Americans have asthma. This is 7.7 percent of adults and 8.4 percent of children.

What is Asthma?

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by variable and recurring symptoms, reversible airflow obstruction, and bronchial spasms. Common symptoms include wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath.

Symptoms

  • coughing, especially at night, when laughing, or during exercise
  • tightness in the chest
  • shortness of breath
  • difficulty talking
  • anxiousness or panic
  • fatigue

Causes

  • Genetics. If a parent or sibling has asthma, you’re more likely to develop it.
  • History of viral infections. People with a history of severe viral infections during childhood (e.g. RSV) may be more likely to develop the condition.
  • Hygiene hypothesis. This theory explains that when babies aren’t exposed to enough bacteria in their early months and years, their immune systems don’t become strong enough to fight off asthma and other allergic conditions.

Treatment

Asthma treatment includes medication along with some lifestyle changes that one can adopt. The treatment for asthma based on its type, the age of patients, and triggers mainly fall into three primary categories:

Breathing Exercises
Quick-acting Treatments
Long term asthma control medications

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